The Natural World:
All Creatures, Great and Small.



Only Connect...

“I know that God is testing us to show us that we are merely animals. Like animals we breathe and die, and we are no better off than they are. It just doesn’t make sense. All living creatures go to the same place. We are made from earth, and we return to the earth. Who really knows if our spirits go up and the spirits of animals go down into the earth?”

Ecclesiastes 3;18:19.

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“The Maker of all things,
The Lord God worship we,
Heaven bright with angels’ wings,
Earth and the white‑waved sea!”

From an old poem in Irish; author and translator not known.

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“They hang the man and flog the woman
That steals the goose from off the common
But let the greater villain loose
That steals the common from the goose.”

Traditional .

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“The sedge is withered from the lake
And no birds sing...”

John Keats.

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Inscription des requins sur la liste des espèces protégées en Province Sud de Nouvelle Calédonie...

Please sign this petition for the Registration of sharks on the list of protected species in South Province of New Caledonia. The introductory text is in French only but the petition itself, which comes from Belgium, is bilingual French / Flemish and is very easy to fill in...

This is a good way to get into the spirit of Christmas 2009!


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Psalm 104
A great and majestic tribute to all creation.


Climate Change: Should Christians Care?

Pope Benedict XVI: Defender of Animals.
Like his much–loved predecessor, Pope John Paul II, the new Pope has condemned the industrialised exploitation of our fellow creatures.

Green Christianity.
This is the text of a sermon preached by scientist Dr. John Biggs during a Morning Worship programme broadcast on Anglia Television in August, 1997.

Viva International
A voice for animals and for the environment.

PETA
People for the Ethical treatment of Animals.

Welcome to MSC online
The MSC works to safeguard the world’s seafood supply by promoting the best environmental choice. Throughout this site you can find out who we are, what we do and information, recipes and facts all about fish. You can also find out how you can play a part in helping look after the oceans.

A Rocha
A Rocha is a Christian nature conservation organisation, our name coming from the Portuguese for ‘the Rock’, as the first initiative was a field study centre in Portugal.

THE PERMANENT EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR THE STUDY OF THE RURAL LANDSCAPE
Founded in the 1950s this organisation is based in the Netherlands.

CRANN
CRANN works to make people aware of our trees, hedgerows and woodlands promoting sustainable and biodiverse woodlands and encouraging the development of a vibrant Irish wood culture.

Pinky and Perky.
Two little birds were we…: a tribute to two albino finches.

A Robin on a Broken Tree
Just four poignant lines of longing for home written in Flanders in July 1917 by Francis Ledwidge not long before he was killed.

The Poplar–Field.
This poem by William Cowper (1731 – 1800) is a comment on the effect on birds of tree felling over 200 years ago.

Binsey Poplars.
Gerald Manley Hopkins (1844 – 1889) takes up Cowper’s theme as he reflects on the felling of another grove of poplars.

The Killing Fields
The destruction of the countryside.

The Parrot.
Do birds have memories and feelings? The Scottish poet Thomas Campbell (1777 – 1844) believed that they do as this poem eloquently testifies.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
The full text of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s legendary tribute to the albatross and to all marine life.

Cyrnol / Colonel.
Horses as well as soldiers took part in World War One. In this poem in Welsh Percy Hughes pays a tender tribute to a horse who had been mortally wounded.
Text in Welsh with a translation into English.

Fáilte don Éan / Welcome to the Bird.
This bitter‑sweet tribute to the cuckoo was written by Ulster poet, Séamus Dall Mac Cuarta (1650 ’ 1733). He lost his sight at an early age but lived to achieve an enduring reputation as one of the masters of Irish poetry.
In Irish with a translation into English.

The Yellow Bittern
A poignantly lovely poem about a migratory bird who died of thirst on a frozen lake. This translation from the Irish, ‘An Bonnán Buí’ by the 18th century Ulster poet Cathal Buí Mac Giolla Gunna, is by Thomas MacDonagh who was executed for his part in the Easter Rising of 1916. The original version has lived on to become one of Ireland’s most celebrated drinking songs...

Mae Cân yn Llond yr Awel / Singing Fills the Breeze.
A poem written by a farmer in the nineteenth century praising the then numerous singing birds of Wales gives us a tantalising glimpse of a vanished world.
Text in Welsh with a translation into English.

Y Llwynog / The Fox
A remarkable sonnet describing a fleeting glimpse of a passing fox.
Text in Welsh with a translation into English.

Bás an Cholúir.
A pigeon dies under the wheels of a car in Cardiff.
In Irish only.

Colomennod mewn Dinas ar Drothwy’r Nadolig / Pigeons in a City on the Threshold of Christmas.
A superbly sensitive poem by contemporary Welsh language poet, Alun Llwyd, about pigeons in Cardiff begging their way through the throngs of Christmas shoppers.
In Welsh with a link to a translation into English.

L’Albatros
‘The Albatross’, a poem by Charles Baudelaire: 1821 – 1867 (in French with an English translation).
The sailors would trap an albatross to humiliate and torment it...

Sheep and Lambs.
Nineteenth century French writer Alphonse Daudet’s short and wonderful eyewitness account of the return of shepherds, dogs, mules, sheep and lambs to their home farm for winter after spending summer on the high Alpine meadows of Provence.
In French with a translation into English.

Volverán las Oscuras Golondrinas / The Dark Swallows Will Come Back Again.
A poem by Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer (1836 – 1870).
In his famously poignant love poem Bécquer reminds us that though the swallows will come back again they will not be the same swallows.
In Spanish with a translation into English.

Der Alpenjäger / The Hunter in the Alps.
A poem by Friedrich Schiller (1759 – 1805).
More than two centuries ago this celebrated writer wrote his great plea for an end to blood sports.
In German with a translation into English.



Ríomhphost / Email / Ebost

(masseytown@yahoo.ie).

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