The Green Dragon No 3, June 1997

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This is a scanned version of the original, including all of the illustrations.
In preparing it some spelling errors have been corrected and some changes made to the original text.


Editor's Introduction


Some Thoughts on the Famine from some of Ireland's poets…


Where are the lowland people gone?
Where are the sun-dark faces now?
The love that kept the quiet hearth,
The strength that held the speeding plough?
- Joseph Campbell


She said, ‘They gave me of their best,
They lived, they gave their lives for me;
I tossed them to the howling waste,
And flung them to the foaming sea.
She said, ‘God knows they owe me nought,
I tossed them to the foaming sea,
I tossed them to the howling waste,
Yet still their love comes home to me.’
- Emily Lawless


When I remember all
The friends so linked together
I’ve seen around me fall
Like leaves in wintry weather
I feel like one
Who treads alone
Some banquet-hall deserted,
Whose lights are fled,
Whose garlands dead
And all but he departed!
Thus in the stilly night
Ere slumber’s chain has bound me,
Sad memory brings the light
Of other days around me.
– Thomas Moore


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Contents

1. The Death of O’Connell
© Father Antaine Ó Duibhir (1903 - 1947). The above is from the closing pages of his Irish language biography of O’Connell, Dónall Ó Conaill, first published in 1949 by An Gúm (the government publications office), Dublin.
Translation Wales Famine Forum.

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2. The Great Famine
This article by Irish Times contributor, © Breandán Ó Cathaoir, was first published in the Famine Timesof January 1997, a newspaper specially published by the Dublin Heritage Group, c/o Walkinstown Library, Percy French Road, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. Tel: 00 353 1 4562528.

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3. An Overview of the Famine in Waterford
By © Jack Burtchael, Waterford. First published in the book, Teacht na bPrátaí Dubha: the Famine in Waterford, 1845-50, published in 1995 by Geography Publications, Dublin.

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4. The Famine Years in An Rinn 1845 - 1850
This article by © Máiréad Breathnach about the Famine in An Rinn / Ring, an Irish-speaking area near Dungarvan, County Waterford, was first published in the Dungarvan Leader on Friday, February 17, 1995.

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5. Amhrán na bPrátaí Dubha / The Song of the Black Potatoes
Máire Ní Dhroma. She lived in An Rinn / Ring, during the famine. Her song – it is still sung today in Irish – is now regarded as a classic.
It was driven underground for many years because she dared to challenge the contemporary and convenient view that the Famine was God’s will, an act of Providence. Translation : The Wales Famine Forum.

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6. Methodists in the Great Irish Famine
© The Rev. D. A. Levistone Cooney, Superintendent Minister, Adare and Ballingrane Circuit, Adare, County Limerick.

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7. The Running Girl
From the book, Paddy’s Lament, by © Thomas Gallagher (New York, 1982). The story is based on the account by Rev. S. Godolphin Osbourne in his book, Gleanings from the West of Ireland, London, 1850.

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8. A Death-Dealing Famine: The Great Hunger in Ireland
An account of the launch of Christine Kinealy's new book by at the Irish Embassy in London on May 20, 1997.

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9. The Great Famine and Today’s Famines
This article by © Cormac Ó Gráda, Professor of Economics, University College, Dublin, reproduced from the Dublin Heritage Group’s Famine Times of January, 1997, is an edited version of the essay of the same title in The Great Irish Famine, ed. Cathal Pórtéir, RTÉ / Mercier Press, Dublin, 1995.

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10. Remember 1847 – 1997: Famine is Political
© Joe Murray is the Coordinator at AfrI (‘Action from Ireland’), Grand Canal House, Lr. Rathmines Road, Dublin 6. Tel: 00 353 1 4968595.

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11. Exploring the Causes of Famine
The above is a statement by the Irish charity, Trócaire (‘Mercy’, cf. Welsh trugaredd) , in Famine Times, published in January, 1997 by the Dublin Heritage Group.
Trócaire may be contacted at 169 Booterstown Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: 00 353 1 2885385.

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12. Overseas Aid: A Statement by Oxfam
Issued in 1997 by Oxfam Wales / Cymru. Tel: 00 44 29 / 20757067.

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13. Wales and Ireland in the Late Nineteenth Century
© Dr. John Davies, retired Professor of History and author of the book, Hanes Cymru (‘The History of Wales’), published some years ago by Penguin Books.
This article was first published in Planet, No. 95, October – November, 1992.

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14. Penmark's Irish Connection
Reproduced with the author's permission from her book Penmark Past, by © Maureen Bullows of Penmark, Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales.

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15. Remembering Them
© Fr. Michael McCarthy I.C. preached this sermon during the Memorial Mass for the victims of the Great Famine at St. Mary’s, Stow Hill, Newport, Gwent, South Wales, on Friday 8 November, 1996.

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16. Saint Illtyd’s Church, Dowlais
© Fr. Nicholas James, was Parish Priest, St. Illtyd’s Church, Dowlais, Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales at the time of writing. He is now Parish Priest of St. Francis / St. Clare's, Ely, Cardiff.

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17. Poem : Phytophtera Infestans
The author of this poem on the , © Steve Hennessy, is an Irish writer living in Bristol.

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18. Poem: St. Patrick in Frederick Street
This flight of fancy by former miner Ben 'Blow' Whelan, who came to Wales as a 7 year-old. was recorded in Bargoed, South Wales, in 1976.
'Frederick Street' is in Cardiff.

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19. Poem: The Llandow Disaster
Another composition by © Ben 'Blow' Whelan, this is a moving account of the crash of a plane full of Welsh rugby supporters at an airfield near Cardiff in 1950 as they came home after playing Ireland in Belfast.

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20 . Poem: The Kingdom of Kerry
© Jessie Boyd, Cwmbran. Married to Belfastman, Sam Boyd, she wrote this poem after a holiday in Kerry many years ago.

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21. Poem and commentary: Breandán Ó Beacháin – Go Raibh Míle Maith Agat!
© Paddy Murphy, Cardiff. Paddy’s grandfather was born 14 miles from Cork. He retired to Cardiff during the 1920s to work upon the railway after serving in the British army in India.
Paddy’s interest in Behan developed through the brainwashing he received from his father, who was, after all, of the same generation as Brendan.
The title means, ‘Brendan Behan - Thank you very much!’.

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22. A Whimsical Irishman
© Brian Lee, Cardiff. He is the author of Cardiff Voices, published by Chalford Publishers.

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23. Growing up in Belfast in the 20s and 30s
© Samuel H. Boyd, who now lives in Wales, was born in 1919 into a working-class Presbyterian family in East Belfast..

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The Green Dragon

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